Wine Times

Knowledge center for the latest research & trends impacting the art of wine experience, viticulture, enology, sustainable production and conscientious consumerism.

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What are tannins?

Tannins are complex biomolecules found in plants, useful in a wide variety of industries.

In the wine industry, the presence of tannins in grape skins, pips and stems allows the production of infinite varieties of wines. In them, the tannins in combination with all their components give rise to products with unique organoleptic characteristics, reflecting the past of the grape, human work and the unique flavor and aroma.

 

Historically, tannins have accompanied the development of human nutrition since its origin, being common and unavoidable components in foods and beverages of vegetable origin, in which they are manifested through flavor and palatability due to their astringency.

 

The word tannin was implemented historically in relationship with the use given to some plant extracts during the process of tanning or converting animal skins into leather. It began more than 2000 years ago in the Mediterranean regions. Later, the term became popular and was used in the scientific literature to refer to these natural compounds.

 

There is not just one tannin, but rather a group of substances with a similar chemical structure.

They have the ability to form complexes with macromolecules, this characteristic explains their astringency. For example, in contact with saliva proteins, they precipitate by breaking it into small parts.

 

The presence of tannins in edible plants and fruits depends largely on factors such as the type and species of the fruit, as well as its state of maturity and environmental conditions. For the fruit, it is an important antioxidant agent, as well as in the human body. Results of scientific studies have shown its positive cardioprotective effects.

 

Wine Times

Knowledge center for the latest research & trends impacting the art of wine experience, viticulture, enology, sustainable production and conscientious consumerism.

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Tannins are complex biomolecules found in plants, useful in a wide variety of industries.

In the wine industry, the presence of tannins in grape skins, pips and stems allows the production of infinite varieties of wines. In them, the tannins in combination with all their components give rise to products with unique organoleptic characteristics, reflecting the past of the grape, human work and the unique flavor and aroma.

 

Historically, tannins have accompanied the development of human nutrition since its origin, being common and unavoidable components in foods and beverages of vegetable origin, in which they are manifested through flavor and palatability due to their astringency.

 

The word tannin was implemented historically in relationship with the use given to some plant extracts during the process of tanning or converting animal skins into leather. It began more than 2000 years ago in the Mediterranean regions. Later, the term became popular and was used in the scientific literature to refer to these natural compounds.

 

There is not just one tannin, but rather a group of substances with a similar chemical structure.

They have the ability to form complexes with macromolecules, this characteristic explains their astringency. For example, in contact with saliva proteins, they precipitate by breaking it into small parts.

 

The presence of tannins in edible plants and fruits depends largely on factors such as the type and species of the fruit, as well as its state of maturity and environmental conditions. For the fruit, it is an important antioxidant agent, as well as in the human body. Results of scientific studies have shown its positive cardioprotective effects.